Follow Their Passion

THE STRUGGLE IS REAL

Podcast

Dig Deeper

About This Episode

Oftentimes the reward of doing an enjoyable activity makes routines or boring procedural practices bearable. If you enjoy playing an instrument, for example, you may practice for hours and hours even on days when your heart’s not in it because of your love of music. As a parent, if you are able to help your son or daughter discover their passion, this can bring them meaning and a sense of purpose. If you tap into the interests they have and help them build discipline around their passion, this will help them be motivated in life. And this motivation can spill over into other areas of their life. Also, at times, you may be able to couple their passion with an activity that they may not enjoy as much. For example, you can help them memorize the times tables (something they may not like) while you dribble a basketball with them outside.

People On This Episode

Alicia La Hoz

Dr. Alicia La Hoz
Resident Expert

Omar Ramos

Omar Ramos
Host

Family Bridges

Veronica Avila
Host

Family Bridges

Arturo Gonzalez
Special Guest

This Week's Action

  • Think about an activity that you do (or have done in the past) that energizes you. If you have stopped doing this, think about re-engaging in this and chart a plan for doing this again. If you are doing something you enjoy, identify the type of resources that you have tapped into to help you integrate this activity in your life. Consider how can you do the same for your children?
  • Take your child’s cue and cultivate an interest they have shown to have. For example, do they like creepy crawlies, snakes and insects? Go to the library and check out books on the topic or watch documentaries with them on nature stuff.
  • Explore your Child’s interests: Check out your park districts workshops and programs. Go through it together with your children/adolescents and pick out one or two things of interest. Register for one class to check it out as an exercise in exploring opportunities and experiences.
  • Discover Talents, Set Goals

More Resources

Family Bridges:

App

Get more resources and tools by downloading our app.

The Struggle is Real:

Book

Learn how to turn the struggle into a success.

Tell A Good Story

THE STRUGGLE IS REAL

Podcast

Dig Deeper

About This Episode

What is your favorite book or movie? The plot probably kept you engaged. And the story was memorable as it appealed to a value you hold dearly, a longing you have, or it resonated with an experience you or someone close to you has had. In the end, good stories teach us lessons that pierce the heart. Your life is a book of stories and these can capture the heart of your children in a powerful way. If you would like to share a belief with your children, share your stories. Just make sure that when you tell the story you take the time to describe the ups and downs. Don’t skip the hardship, describe the struggle. As you do so, your life will become authentic, you will create a deep connection with your children, and your beliefs and ideas will take shape and form in a very concrete and tangible way.

People On This Episode

Alicia La Hoz

Dr. Alicia La Hoz
Resident Expert

Omar Ramos

Omar Ramos
Host

Family Bridges

Veronica Avila
Host

lissette Cardona

Lissette Cardona
Special Guest

This Week's Action

  • Share a story with your child about a time when you had to overcome an obstacle or achieve a goal.
  • Then ask them about a time when they have had to do the same.
  • Click here for activities to do with your children to help them express themselves through story.

More Resources

Family Bridges:

App

Get more resources and tools by downloading our app.

The Struggle is Real:

Book

Learn how to turn the struggle into a success.

Appeal To Their Progress

THE STRUGGLE IS REAL

Podcast

Dig Deeper

About This Episode

Highlight the progress your child has made as a motivator for ongoing growth. It is human nature to notice what is wrong, what needs to get done, and what hasn’t been done. Make an effort to focus on the successful milestones achieved, even if these are minor.

People on this episode

Alicia La Hoz

Dr. Alicia La Hoz
Resident Expert

Omar Ramos

Omar Ramos
Host

Family Bridges

Veronica Avila
Host

Ashley Reed

Ashley Reed
Special Guest

This Week's Action

Practice recognizing the steps your kids take or the positive strides made towards their new habit. For example:

  • Going to bed on time: “I liked that you started getting ready for bed right away without waiting for me to repeat myself.”
  • Learn how to budget for things they want: “You are showing some good self-control right now”
  • Homework: “Keep tackling that math homework with the same perseverance you showed when building that snow fort the other day with your friends.” “When you set your mind to finishing something, you can overcome the most difficult challenges”
  • Relieve Bedtime Stories
  • Budget for things they want
  • Homework

Create Vision

  • Set a goal with your kids regarding a specific activity you’d like them to learn. In the resource section below, there are printable worksheets that describe how to set SMART goals. You can print out these worksheets, and give your kids space to write in the goal that you both think that they can reach. Then brainstorm together about the steps it would take to reach the written goal.
  • If your child is a visual learner, they can draw out what completing the steps of their goal might look like.

More Resources

Family Bridges:

App

Get more resources and tools by downloading our app.

The Struggle is Real:

Book

Learn how to turn the struggle into a success.

Go For Their Heart

THE STRUGGLE IS REAL

Podcast

Dig Deeper

About This Episode

When your child is clearly upset, put your reasons and logic on hold, and get down at their level. Recognize the feelings they are expressing and call those out. By doing so, you’ll give your child a vocabulary of emotions that they can draw on to describe how they are feeling about situations.  Once they are able to express themselves clearly, and they calm down, they will be in a better place to listen to the advice, rules and expectations you want to go over with them. To help children own and understand their own feelings, though, it’s helpful to also work on recognizing these feelings for yourself as well. When you are able to understand and manage your own feelings, you’ll be able to help others work through theirs.  As you recognize your child’s feelings, they will feel validated and instead of resisting, they will be more inclined to join you.

People On This Episode

Alicia La Hoz

Dr. Alicia La Hoz
Resident Expert

Omar Ramos

Omar Ramos
Host

Family Bridges

Veronica Avila
Host

Rosana Sierra-Sweich

Rosana Sierra-Swiech
Special Guest

This Week's Action

Practice recognizing your children’s feelings

Example 1

  • Action: You see your child kick his sibling
  • Response: “You are upset right now. Go ahead and take a break in your room and we will talk some more about this after you cool off.”                      

Example 2 

  • Action: Adolescent rolls his/her eyes at you
  • Response: “When you rolled your eyes at me, that was hurtful. You don’t care for what I have to say and it is disappointing to me that you don’t value my opinion or our rules.”

Example 3 

  • Action: Child says, “I can’t do this.”
  • Response: “It can be frustrating for a moment when you feel stuck in a problem, like your homework.”

Tools

More Resources

Family Bridges:

App

Get more resources and tools by downloading our app.

The Struggle is Real:

Book

Learn how to turn the struggle into a success.

To Bribe Or Not to Bribe

THE STRUGGLE IS REAL

Podcast

Dig Deeper

About This Episode

While giving kids tokens like stickers works especially well when they are young, we’d like them to be motivated by more than a shiny star. Plus, it can be a bit taxing and demanding for a parent to consistently be on the alert for rewardable good behavior. When they are motivated on their own accord, it’s less work for you as a parent. One agent that motivates kids (and adults alike) is feeling autonomous. Meaning that they have a sense of agency, that they are recognized, that they are valued, that their choices and opinions matter.

People On This Episode

Alicia La Hoz

Dr. Alicia La Hoz
Resident Expert

Omar Ramos

Omar Ramos
Host

Family Bridges

Veronica Avila
Host

Family Bridges

Victoria Garcia
Special Guest

This Week's Action

Step One: Choose a habit you would like your child to work on

Step Two: Practice giving them 2-3 choices when asking them to do these things.

Examples:

Habit 1: Organize school supplies

  • Decorate boxes for school supplies with materials of their choosing
  • Give them a couple of choices of times when to work on this (i.e., after school on Wednesday, Saturday morning)

Habit 2: Clean room

  • Choose what to clean first; Pick up toys first or put the Legos away first
  • Pick a time; they can clean their room on the weekend or in the morning before heading out to school or in the evening after dinner. 

Habit 3: Have limited use of technology 

  • Choose between watching 30 min of favorite show OR 30 minutes of playing on the Tablet
  • Play video games for x minutes OR watch favorite movie

Tools to help you:

More Resources

Family Bridges:

App

Get more resources and tools by downloading our app.

The Struggle is Real:

Book

Learn how to turn the struggle into a success.

The Hamburger

THE STRUGGLE IS REAL

Podcast

Dig Deeper

About This Episode

When you’d like your children/adolescents to learn a new habit or skill and they resist it is usually because they don’t know how or are not developmentally able to, don’t have any desire to do so, or get distracted or overwhelmed.  When they resist, ask yourself three questions.  You can remember the questions by thinking about it as a hamburger.

Top bun: Can my child do the task required of him?

Meat: Does my child want to do this task? Why or why not?

Bottom bun: What does my child have to do in order to succeed in this task?

People On This Episode

Alicia La Hoz

Dr. Alicia La Hoz
Resident Expert

Omar Ramos

Omar Ramos
Host

Family Bridges

Veronica Avila
Host

Marvin Del Rios

Marvin Del Rios
Special Guest

This Week's Action

  • Think of a new positive habit you would like your child to learn. For example, eat more vegetables, make their bed every day, say “please” and “thank you” with every request, or any other skill you would like them to develop.
  • Over the next few days, use the Hamburger Method to practice this habit with your child. We’ll check in with you on Friday to see how it’s going.

Tools

More Resources

Family Bridges:

App

Get more resources and tools by downloading our app.

The Struggle is Real:

Book

Learn how to turn the struggle into a success.